Abstract

Mite pest problems in Utah apple orchards became generally serious about 1944, when DDT was first used extensively to control Codling moths, Carpocapsa pomonella (Linn.) (Jorgensen, 1967}. Since then several investigators (Pickett et al., 1946; Lord, 1949; Pickett, 1955; Lord, Herbert, and MacPhee, 1958) have examined the influence of various spray programs on apple orchard fauna, while still others (Clancy and Pollard, 1952; Morgan, Anderson, and Swales, 1958; Oat-man and Legner, 1962) have conducted related studies with widely used broad spectrum pesticides on apple mites and their predators. All seem to lend credence to the theory that mite pest problems on apples resulted primarily from the reduction or elimination of natural enemies with pesti-cides. Still other factors as m9ntioned by Huffaker, van de Vrie, and McMurtry (1970) may have profound effects on, or be a principal cause of mite outbreaks in some situations. Presently, integration of natural and chemical control methods for mites seems essential. Van Den Bosch and Stern (1962) and Jorgensen (1967) redefined the control target when they emphasized that in the development of an integrated control program, the entire ecosystem, rather than isolated pest species, must be of primary concern.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1971-08-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd116

Keywords

Acaricides; Apples; Diseases and pests; Chryosopa carnes Stephens; Mites; Horticulture, Utah

Language

English

Included in

Life Sciences Commons

Share

COinS