Content Category

Literary Criticism

Abstract/Description

“Zerinda—A Fairy Tale,” a largely forgotten British fairy tale found in Maria Jane Jewsbury’s Phantasmagoria: Sketches of Life and Literature (1825), a Romantic miscellany, serves as the basis of my analysis exploring how hegemony and wonder work together and against one another in the tale. This embodiment of heteroglossia serves as a doubling of the audience in its work to appeal to children and adults. The heteroglossia of audience in the text seems to be tightly linked with how wonder is portrayed. Zohar Shavit and Marina Warner’s insights into the child/adult divide of fairy tales and how they seek different types of wonder will be insightful into exploring the implications of this relationship, particularly in regards to the polyvocality of adult and child appeal alongside the heteroglossia of wonder and hegemony.

Origin of Submission

as part of a class

Faculty Involvement

Jill Rudy

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A Phantasmagoric Fairy Tale: “Zerinda” and the Doubling of Wonder

“Zerinda—A Fairy Tale,” a largely forgotten British fairy tale found in Maria Jane Jewsbury’s Phantasmagoria: Sketches of Life and Literature (1825), a Romantic miscellany, serves as the basis of my analysis exploring how hegemony and wonder work together and against one another in the tale. This embodiment of heteroglossia serves as a doubling of the audience in its work to appeal to children and adults. The heteroglossia of audience in the text seems to be tightly linked with how wonder is portrayed. Zohar Shavit and Marina Warner’s insights into the child/adult divide of fairy tales and how they seek different types of wonder will be insightful into exploring the implications of this relationship, particularly in regards to the polyvocality of adult and child appeal alongside the heteroglossia of wonder and hegemony.