Content Category

Literary Criticism

Abstract/Description

At a young age, James Joyce was disillusioned with the Catholic Church, seeing corruption and intolerance toward humanity within the institution. As a result, he stated solemnly of the Church, "I make war with it by what I write and say and do." In his short story "The Dead," we see a complex criticism of the Catholic Church through characterization, imagery, and symbols.

Joyce uses the main character, Gabriel, as the vehicle of the criticism. He portrays the different characteristics of the Church through Gabriel, all culminating in the moment of epiphany at the end of the story, where he must decide whether or not to change. Here Joyce passes his own final judgment on the Catholic Church, warning that if it does not change its ways, it will suffer a metaphorical punishment in hell; in other words, that it will become an obsolete and broken institution.

Location

B132 JFSB

Start Date

20-3-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

20-3-2015 1:30 PM

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Mar 20th, 12:00 PM Mar 20th, 1:30 PM

James Joyce and His War with the Catholic Church

B132 JFSB

At a young age, James Joyce was disillusioned with the Catholic Church, seeing corruption and intolerance toward humanity within the institution. As a result, he stated solemnly of the Church, "I make war with it by what I write and say and do." In his short story "The Dead," we see a complex criticism of the Catholic Church through characterization, imagery, and symbols.

Joyce uses the main character, Gabriel, as the vehicle of the criticism. He portrays the different characteristics of the Church through Gabriel, all culminating in the moment of epiphany at the end of the story, where he must decide whether or not to change. Here Joyce passes his own final judgment on the Catholic Church, warning that if it does not change its ways, it will suffer a metaphorical punishment in hell; in other words, that it will become an obsolete and broken institution.