Keywords

Water sensitive urban design; DANCE4Water; Incentives

Location

Session D4: Water Resources Management and Planning - Modelling and Software for Improving Decisions and Engaging Stakeholders

Start Date

12-7-2016 10:50 AM

End Date

12-7-2016 11:10 AM

Description

Water sensitive urban design (WSUD) often consists of decentralized multi-functional technologies which are capable of producing both private and public benefits. However, private costs often outweigh private benefits, and therefore agencies must often provide incentives to encourage adoption of such technologies. Scarce resources also require cost-effective schemes. However, there is a lack of comprehensive analysis of the performance of incentive schemes to promote WSUD. In this paper, we develop an agent-based model to study the effectiveness of an incentive scheme to promote adoption of rain water tanks. Using a case-study based on Melbourne, we study how its cost-effectiveness changes with targeting different sizes of rain water tanks (2, 5, 10 kl) and different proportion of districts affected by heat stress. We observe that targeting smaller sized tanks promotes quicker adoption but is less cost-effective in terms of water savings and environmental services per dollar. Public agencies can use such information in developing more targeted approaches to promote WSUD technologies.

 
Jul 12th, 10:50 AM Jul 12th, 11:10 AM

Effectiveness of incentives to promote adoption of water sensitive urban design: A case study on rain water harvesting tanks

Session D4: Water Resources Management and Planning - Modelling and Software for Improving Decisions and Engaging Stakeholders

Water sensitive urban design (WSUD) often consists of decentralized multi-functional technologies which are capable of producing both private and public benefits. However, private costs often outweigh private benefits, and therefore agencies must often provide incentives to encourage adoption of such technologies. Scarce resources also require cost-effective schemes. However, there is a lack of comprehensive analysis of the performance of incentive schemes to promote WSUD. In this paper, we develop an agent-based model to study the effectiveness of an incentive scheme to promote adoption of rain water tanks. Using a case-study based on Melbourne, we study how its cost-effectiveness changes with targeting different sizes of rain water tanks (2, 5, 10 kl) and different proportion of districts affected by heat stress. We observe that targeting smaller sized tanks promotes quicker adoption but is less cost-effective in terms of water savings and environmental services per dollar. Public agencies can use such information in developing more targeted approaches to promote WSUD technologies.