Keywords

Invasive species; ecosystem; intentional and unintentional introduction; framework; decision-making.

Location

Session D9: Methods and Models to Assess Resiliency and Vulnerability in Environmental Systems

Start Date

13-7-2016 3:10 PM

End Date

13-7-2016 3:30 PM

Description

Invasion of nonindigenous species is one of the most pressing global challenges, causing substantial environmental, economic and social harm. Invasion of alien species alters the composition, structure and functioning of invaded ecosystems as well as the services they generated before the invasion. Decisions about the management of invasive cases are inherently difficult because of the multifactorial and multiattribute scope of the problem. In particular, the resilience limits of invaded ecosystems to fully recover original, pre-invaded states remain unclear. To facilitate management efforts, decision-makers and environmental practitioners require a framework integrating relevant knowledge and acting as a supporting expert system. The underlying methodology and a conceptual architecture of the framework in support of decision-making in invasive cases (FDMISC) are presented in this paper. The framework consists of three main modules: “Environment”, “Forest Ecosystem” and “Management”. The functions of each architectural model as well as challenges in the implementation of the framework are also discussed.

 
Jul 13th, 3:10 PM Jul 13th, 3:30 PM

A Framework for Decision-Making in Cases of Invasive Species

Session D9: Methods and Models to Assess Resiliency and Vulnerability in Environmental Systems

Invasion of nonindigenous species is one of the most pressing global challenges, causing substantial environmental, economic and social harm. Invasion of alien species alters the composition, structure and functioning of invaded ecosystems as well as the services they generated before the invasion. Decisions about the management of invasive cases are inherently difficult because of the multifactorial and multiattribute scope of the problem. In particular, the resilience limits of invaded ecosystems to fully recover original, pre-invaded states remain unclear. To facilitate management efforts, decision-makers and environmental practitioners require a framework integrating relevant knowledge and acting as a supporting expert system. The underlying methodology and a conceptual architecture of the framework in support of decision-making in invasive cases (FDMISC) are presented in this paper. The framework consists of three main modules: “Environment”, “Forest Ecosystem” and “Management”. The functions of each architectural model as well as challenges in the implementation of the framework are also discussed.