Keywords

Surface runoff, Nitrates flux, Swat, Tafna catchment.

Location

Session A7: Integrated management of water, land and ecosystems

Start Date

12-7-2016 5:10 PM

End Date

12-7-2016 5:30 PM

Abstract

Water in North-West of Africa is an increasingly valuable resource due to high competition between agriculture, industry and drinking water supply, accentuated by frequent drought conditions in a semi-arid climate. For a few decades, the demographic explosion, the development of agriculture and industry, and the building of water infrastructures (dams) have modified the water fluxes and the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen towards an increased production of nitrates in waters. The objectives of this study are to propose a modelling approach to quantify the contribution of the Tafna coastal watershed (North-West of Africa) to the flux of nitrates into the Mediterranean Sea. The modelling approach is made to identify and to understand (1) the climatic controlling factors of the nitrate exportations, and (2) the role of dams in the retention of nitrates, integrating the impact of current agricultural practices on surface water. This approach will help us to quantify the contribution of the watershed to the eutrophication of the Mediterranean Sea while predicting the load of nitrates carried down to the marine waters. To do so, we applied the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which has been widely used to assess hydrology in various catchments. SWAT helps identify pollution sources, and assesses the impacts of climate change and agricultural management practices. Many authors focused on nitrate but few of them studied the North Africa rivers. The application of SWAT has shown that dams have a great influence on surface runoff and in the retention of nitrates. It also highlighted the necessity to implement a more sustainable water resources management strategy in the Tafna region which water resource is limited and vary greatly with more intense low flow episodes. The results obtained are very encouraging: SWAT makes it possible to correctly represent the dynamics of water and nitrate flow in the Tafna watershed. The study can inspire us to calibrate other parameters such as sediment concentrations and phosphorus. Also, SWAT is an effective tool for planners and stakeholders to manage water in different catchments in Algeria.

 
Jul 12th, 5:10 PM Jul 12th, 5:30 PM

Application of the SWAT model to investigate surface runoff and nitrate flux towards the Mediterranean Sea: case of the Tafna catchment (North-West of Africa)

Session A7: Integrated management of water, land and ecosystems

Water in North-West of Africa is an increasingly valuable resource due to high competition between agriculture, industry and drinking water supply, accentuated by frequent drought conditions in a semi-arid climate. For a few decades, the demographic explosion, the development of agriculture and industry, and the building of water infrastructures (dams) have modified the water fluxes and the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen towards an increased production of nitrates in waters. The objectives of this study are to propose a modelling approach to quantify the contribution of the Tafna coastal watershed (North-West of Africa) to the flux of nitrates into the Mediterranean Sea. The modelling approach is made to identify and to understand (1) the climatic controlling factors of the nitrate exportations, and (2) the role of dams in the retention of nitrates, integrating the impact of current agricultural practices on surface water. This approach will help us to quantify the contribution of the watershed to the eutrophication of the Mediterranean Sea while predicting the load of nitrates carried down to the marine waters. To do so, we applied the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which has been widely used to assess hydrology in various catchments. SWAT helps identify pollution sources, and assesses the impacts of climate change and agricultural management practices. Many authors focused on nitrate but few of them studied the North Africa rivers. The application of SWAT has shown that dams have a great influence on surface runoff and in the retention of nitrates. It also highlighted the necessity to implement a more sustainable water resources management strategy in the Tafna region which water resource is limited and vary greatly with more intense low flow episodes. The results obtained are very encouraging: SWAT makes it possible to correctly represent the dynamics of water and nitrate flow in the Tafna watershed. The study can inspire us to calibrate other parameters such as sediment concentrations and phosphorus. Also, SWAT is an effective tool for planners and stakeholders to manage water in different catchments in Algeria.