Keywords

Water distribution systems; community structure; graph clustering and partitioning

Location

Session H2: Water Resources Management and Planning - Modeling and Software for Improving Decisions and Engaging Stakeholders

Start Date

18-6-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

18-6-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

Water distribution systems (WDS) are complex pipe networks with looped and branching topologies that often comprise of thousands of links and nodes. This work presents a generic framework for improved analysis and management of WDS by partitioning the system into smaller (almost) independent sub-systems with balanced loads and minimal number of interconnections. This paper compares the performance of three classes of unsupervised learning algorithms from graph theory for practical sub-zoning of WDS: (1) Graph clustering – a bottom-up algorithm for clustering n objects with respect to a similarity function, (2) Community structure – a bottom-up algorithm based on network modularity property, which is a measure of the quality of network partition to clusters versus randomly generated graph with respect to the same nodal degree, and (3) Graph partitioning – a flat partitioning algorithm for dividing a network with n nodes into k clusters, such that the total weight of edges crossing between clusters is minimized and the loads of all the clusters are balanced. The algorithms are adapted to WDS to provide a decision support tool for water utilities. The proposed methods are applied and results are demonstrated for a large-scale water distribution system serving heavily populated areas in Singapore.

 
Jun 18th, 9:00 AM Jun 18th, 10:30 AM

Multi-level automated sub-zoning of water distribution systems

Session H2: Water Resources Management and Planning - Modeling and Software for Improving Decisions and Engaging Stakeholders

Water distribution systems (WDS) are complex pipe networks with looped and branching topologies that often comprise of thousands of links and nodes. This work presents a generic framework for improved analysis and management of WDS by partitioning the system into smaller (almost) independent sub-systems with balanced loads and minimal number of interconnections. This paper compares the performance of three classes of unsupervised learning algorithms from graph theory for practical sub-zoning of WDS: (1) Graph clustering – a bottom-up algorithm for clustering n objects with respect to a similarity function, (2) Community structure – a bottom-up algorithm based on network modularity property, which is a measure of the quality of network partition to clusters versus randomly generated graph with respect to the same nodal degree, and (3) Graph partitioning – a flat partitioning algorithm for dividing a network with n nodes into k clusters, such that the total weight of edges crossing between clusters is minimized and the loads of all the clusters are balanced. The algorithms are adapted to WDS to provide a decision support tool for water utilities. The proposed methods are applied and results are demonstrated for a large-scale water distribution system serving heavily populated areas in Singapore.