Keywords

Passive Aeration Systems; Pumped Flow Biofilm Reactor (PFBR); Wastewater Treatment Technology; Batch Biofilm Reactor; AQUASIM, Biofilm

Location

Session H2: Water Resources Management and Planning - Modeling and Software for Improving Decisions and Engaging Stakeholders

Start Date

18-6-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

18-6-2014 10:20 AM

Description

Mathematical modelling of biofilm reactors can be complicated and time-consuming due to the complexity of the biofilms and a wide range of models have been developed to simulate biofilm reactors.

The Pumped Flow Biofilm Reactor (PFBR) is a new biofilm-based passive aeration system (PAS) that is an example of a complex biofilm system. The PFBR is a two reactor technology that employs a unique hydraulic regime and enables aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions to be sequenced . Biofilm, growing on plastic media modules within the two reactors, is aerated passively as wastewater is moved alternately between the reactors during an aeration sequence. The two reactors (R1 and R2) empty and fill a number of times during a typical aeration sequence, exposing, in turn, the biofilm to atmospheric air and wastewater. Furthermore while the PFBR has many of the features of a sequencing batch reactor the fill and discharge from the system typically take place in reactors 1 and 2 respectively.

Thus the system, while simple to design and operate, provides a particular challenge to modellers. Given its complexity, due to the passive aeration system achieved using a unique hydraulic flow regime; previous models have only been concerned with simulating the effluent from the PFBR. The results showed excellent correlation between experimental and modelled effluent results however these models were only suitable to be used at macro scale level (i.e. wastewater characteristics).

In this paper the following objectives have been set forth for this investigation: (1) develop a unique biofilm model for the PFBR, (2) calibrate the effluent characteristics and the cycle performance of the PFBR, (3) identify the biofilm composition, (4) model the biofilm thickness using a confined reactor and an unconfined reactor.

 
Jun 18th, 9:00 AM Jun 18th, 10:20 AM

Developing an AQUASIM biofilm model to simulate a novel batch biofilm passive aeration technology

Session H2: Water Resources Management and Planning - Modeling and Software for Improving Decisions and Engaging Stakeholders

Mathematical modelling of biofilm reactors can be complicated and time-consuming due to the complexity of the biofilms and a wide range of models have been developed to simulate biofilm reactors.

The Pumped Flow Biofilm Reactor (PFBR) is a new biofilm-based passive aeration system (PAS) that is an example of a complex biofilm system. The PFBR is a two reactor technology that employs a unique hydraulic regime and enables aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions to be sequenced . Biofilm, growing on plastic media modules within the two reactors, is aerated passively as wastewater is moved alternately between the reactors during an aeration sequence. The two reactors (R1 and R2) empty and fill a number of times during a typical aeration sequence, exposing, in turn, the biofilm to atmospheric air and wastewater. Furthermore while the PFBR has many of the features of a sequencing batch reactor the fill and discharge from the system typically take place in reactors 1 and 2 respectively.

Thus the system, while simple to design and operate, provides a particular challenge to modellers. Given its complexity, due to the passive aeration system achieved using a unique hydraulic flow regime; previous models have only been concerned with simulating the effluent from the PFBR. The results showed excellent correlation between experimental and modelled effluent results however these models were only suitable to be used at macro scale level (i.e. wastewater characteristics).

In this paper the following objectives have been set forth for this investigation: (1) develop a unique biofilm model for the PFBR, (2) calibrate the effluent characteristics and the cycle performance of the PFBR, (3) identify the biofilm composition, (4) model the biofilm thickness using a confined reactor and an unconfined reactor.