Keywords

Participatory modelling; decision support, socio-technical systems, science-based dialogue, energy-water-mining.

Location

Session F3: Modeling with Stakeholders: Old Problems, New Solutions

Start Date

17-6-2014 3:40 PM

End Date

17-6-2014 5:20 PM

Description

Sound science and adequate models of systems are necessary for environmental decisions, yet frequently it is insufficient. The ENCOMPASS and ECOGES projects aim to create science-based deliberation among diverse stakeholders about water-energy-mineral use and choices in the Atacama Desert region of Chile. The projects seek to improve levels of understanding and open possibilities for collaborative problem solving by engaging industry, academics, and indigenous communities in a long- term participatory modeling process.

Since 2009 the initiative has brought people into collaborative discussions, building technical knowledge and bridging across sectors that are often at odds over management of earth resources. Today, participants are co-designing a renewable energy plant with the goal of establishing operation by the indigenous community as a sustainable business. The proposed plant serves as a focal topic for participatory modeling and a sustained dialogue process for the multi-sector stakeholder group.

While active deliberation is underway, the project began in the shadow of marked conflict and tensions among participants. Methodologically, tensions have been reduced by combining social process with information delivery that leverages interactive touch screen applications. Models and information act as boundary objects among participants and the tenets of a conflict resolution process called sustained dialogue provide guidance for facilitating the group sessions.

Early results indicate that the gesture-enabled touch screens are useful for establishing an accessible environment for deliberation because subject matter experts and laypeople can interact with information with equal ease. Social process has been critical for bridging scales, managing group expectations and relationships, and addressing differences in epistemological and cultural perspectives.

 
Jun 17th, 3:40 PM Jun 17th, 5:20 PM

Essential elements for participatory modelling: Using deliberative engagement and gesture-enabled interfaces to implement energy-mineral-water solutions in the Atacama Desert, Chile

Session F3: Modeling with Stakeholders: Old Problems, New Solutions

Sound science and adequate models of systems are necessary for environmental decisions, yet frequently it is insufficient. The ENCOMPASS and ECOGES projects aim to create science-based deliberation among diverse stakeholders about water-energy-mineral use and choices in the Atacama Desert region of Chile. The projects seek to improve levels of understanding and open possibilities for collaborative problem solving by engaging industry, academics, and indigenous communities in a long- term participatory modeling process.

Since 2009 the initiative has brought people into collaborative discussions, building technical knowledge and bridging across sectors that are often at odds over management of earth resources. Today, participants are co-designing a renewable energy plant with the goal of establishing operation by the indigenous community as a sustainable business. The proposed plant serves as a focal topic for participatory modeling and a sustained dialogue process for the multi-sector stakeholder group.

While active deliberation is underway, the project began in the shadow of marked conflict and tensions among participants. Methodologically, tensions have been reduced by combining social process with information delivery that leverages interactive touch screen applications. Models and information act as boundary objects among participants and the tenets of a conflict resolution process called sustained dialogue provide guidance for facilitating the group sessions.

Early results indicate that the gesture-enabled touch screens are useful for establishing an accessible environment for deliberation because subject matter experts and laypeople can interact with information with equal ease. Social process has been critical for bridging scales, managing group expectations and relationships, and addressing differences in epistemological and cultural perspectives.