Keywords

Stereoscopic 3D, Head tracking, 3D immersive visualization

Location

Session D2: Virtual Reality, 3D Applications, and Immersive Visualization

Start Date

17-6-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

17-6-2014 3:20 PM

Description

The use of large-scale stereoscopic immersive visualization environments is growing globally as a supplement to field work in environmental science and engineering. Such systems typically include large-scale stereoscopic displays and head/hand tracking to facilitate an immersive user experience. These components can add significant cost and complication to such a system that may not be warranted if the components do not significantly improve the user experience. This paper presents a study conducted in a large-scale visualization environment called the VuePod, to help determine the relative value of head-tracking and stereoscopic technologies in terms of improved data interpretation. Forty-eight individuals were recruited for a human subjects study involving the performance of tasks in navigation and interpretation using three distinct datasets. Each user anonymously performed tasks on each dataset in one of four different system configurations. The four configurations included motion tracking with stereoscopic 3D, motion tracking with no stereoscopic 3D, no motion tracking with stereoscopic 3D, and no motion tracking with no stereoscopic 3D. Each task was timed and a score was assigned based on the accuracy of the task performance. Scores were scaled against performance time and plotted in rank order for visual assessment of task performance in each system configuration. Visual assessment, together with Student's T tests indicate a lack of statistically significant differences between the performance metrics of each of the test groups. These results suggest additional work is needed to further determine the relative benefit of each of the target technologies for performance of common data analysis and visualization tasks.

 
Jun 17th, 2:00 PM Jun 17th, 3:20 PM

Assessing the Relative Value of Stereoscopic 3D versus Head Tracking in Large Scale Immersive Visualization

Session D2: Virtual Reality, 3D Applications, and Immersive Visualization

The use of large-scale stereoscopic immersive visualization environments is growing globally as a supplement to field work in environmental science and engineering. Such systems typically include large-scale stereoscopic displays and head/hand tracking to facilitate an immersive user experience. These components can add significant cost and complication to such a system that may not be warranted if the components do not significantly improve the user experience. This paper presents a study conducted in a large-scale visualization environment called the VuePod, to help determine the relative value of head-tracking and stereoscopic technologies in terms of improved data interpretation. Forty-eight individuals were recruited for a human subjects study involving the performance of tasks in navigation and interpretation using three distinct datasets. Each user anonymously performed tasks on each dataset in one of four different system configurations. The four configurations included motion tracking with stereoscopic 3D, motion tracking with no stereoscopic 3D, no motion tracking with stereoscopic 3D, and no motion tracking with no stereoscopic 3D. Each task was timed and a score was assigned based on the accuracy of the task performance. Scores were scaled against performance time and plotted in rank order for visual assessment of task performance in each system configuration. Visual assessment, together with Student's T tests indicate a lack of statistically significant differences between the performance metrics of each of the test groups. These results suggest additional work is needed to further determine the relative benefit of each of the target technologies for performance of common data analysis and visualization tasks.