Keywords

interoperability; modelling; freshwater; framework

Location

Session B1: Research Infrastructures for Integrated Environmental Modeling

Start Date

16-6-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

16-6-2014 3:20 PM

Description

Recent freshwater policy initiatives in New Zealand have highlighted the need for integrated and interoperable freshwater models and data sources. In response, we evaluated a range of software frameworks for interoperable freshwater modelling. A workshop on user needs identified a spectrum of framework users, ranging from ‘indirect users’ such as policy makers, to ‘developers’ such as software engineers concerned with developing and implementing frameworks. To address calls for clearer information on available models and data sources, we developed databases of models and data sources along with an interactive tool to query the database and illustrate potential data-model and model-model couplings. Existing frameworks were reviewed and evaluated against user needs, leading to the selection one framework, OMS3, for more detailed testing. We successfully set up several small models and third-party visualisation and geo-spatial tools as OMS3 components using a range of approaches, liked these in the framework, accessed a simple model as a web service, developed a graphical user interface to modify XML input files, and accessed time-series and spatial data through OGG-compliant web services. These tests were encouraging. However, implementing complex real- world user interfaces in OMS3 would require writing the user interface from scratch. Other limitations of OMS3 included little provision for spatial data and complex data structure, and difficulties incorporating

.NET-based dll’s. Indirect users called for demonstration of a complex spatio-temporal and cross- domain application with a polished user interface, and this is proposed as a next step before committing fully to OMS3. Web services approaches to model delivery and integration seemed attractive to overcome some institutional and technical barriers that were identified, and a staged pathway for adoption of web services was proposed.

 
Jun 16th, 2:00 PM Jun 16th, 3:20 PM

Testing Tales: Selection and Evaluation of a Framework for Interoperable Freshwater Modelling

Session B1: Research Infrastructures for Integrated Environmental Modeling

Recent freshwater policy initiatives in New Zealand have highlighted the need for integrated and interoperable freshwater models and data sources. In response, we evaluated a range of software frameworks for interoperable freshwater modelling. A workshop on user needs identified a spectrum of framework users, ranging from ‘indirect users’ such as policy makers, to ‘developers’ such as software engineers concerned with developing and implementing frameworks. To address calls for clearer information on available models and data sources, we developed databases of models and data sources along with an interactive tool to query the database and illustrate potential data-model and model-model couplings. Existing frameworks were reviewed and evaluated against user needs, leading to the selection one framework, OMS3, for more detailed testing. We successfully set up several small models and third-party visualisation and geo-spatial tools as OMS3 components using a range of approaches, liked these in the framework, accessed a simple model as a web service, developed a graphical user interface to modify XML input files, and accessed time-series and spatial data through OGG-compliant web services. These tests were encouraging. However, implementing complex real- world user interfaces in OMS3 would require writing the user interface from scratch. Other limitations of OMS3 included little provision for spatial data and complex data structure, and difficulties incorporating

.NET-based dll’s. Indirect users called for demonstration of a complex spatio-temporal and cross- domain application with a polished user interface, and this is proposed as a next step before committing fully to OMS3. Web services approaches to model delivery and integration seemed attractive to overcome some institutional and technical barriers that were identified, and a staged pathway for adoption of web services was proposed.