Presenter/Author Information

Kristina Voigt
Hagen Scherb
Ralf Kusmierz

Keywords

sex ratio, chemical plants in germany, chemical parks in germany, logistic regression

Start Date

1-7-2012 12:00 AM

Description

The ratio of male to female offspring at birth may be a simple and non-invasive way to monitor the reproductive health of a population. Except in societies where selective abortion skews the sex ratio (SR), approximately 105 boys are born for every 100 girls. It is said that the sex ratio at birth is remarkably constant. In a systematic review, 100 studies were examined concerning possible environmental or occupational sex odds determinants, like e.g. ionizing radiation or chemicals.In a recently published study by the authors the effect of ionizing radiation on the alteration of sex odds in the vicinity of German nuclear facilities was investigated. The authors revealed an increase in the sex odds. We now want to investigate whether chemical sites also influence the human sex odds at birth.To assess spatial, temporal, as well as spatial-temporal trends in the sex odds and to investigate possible changes in the vicinity of chemical plants, we apply ordinary linear logistic regression.The current study is considered a first screening approach applying the same methodology on chemical sites as in sex odds study in the vicinity of German nuclear facilities. In this approach 10 chemical sites in Germany (large chemical plants and chemical parks) were taken into consideration. It can be demonstrated that small alterations take place in the vicinity of large chemical plants. Furthermore, stronger changes in sex odds can be observed in the vicinity of the investigated chemical plant where an accident took place.

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Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

Chemicals’ Risks versus Radiation Risks with Respect to the Alteration of Human Sex Odds: A Preliminary Evaluation Approach

The ratio of male to female offspring at birth may be a simple and non-invasive way to monitor the reproductive health of a population. Except in societies where selective abortion skews the sex ratio (SR), approximately 105 boys are born for every 100 girls. It is said that the sex ratio at birth is remarkably constant. In a systematic review, 100 studies were examined concerning possible environmental or occupational sex odds determinants, like e.g. ionizing radiation or chemicals.In a recently published study by the authors the effect of ionizing radiation on the alteration of sex odds in the vicinity of German nuclear facilities was investigated. The authors revealed an increase in the sex odds. We now want to investigate whether chemical sites also influence the human sex odds at birth.To assess spatial, temporal, as well as spatial-temporal trends in the sex odds and to investigate possible changes in the vicinity of chemical plants, we apply ordinary linear logistic regression.The current study is considered a first screening approach applying the same methodology on chemical sites as in sex odds study in the vicinity of German nuclear facilities. In this approach 10 chemical sites in Germany (large chemical plants and chemical parks) were taken into consideration. It can be demonstrated that small alterations take place in the vicinity of large chemical plants. Furthermore, stronger changes in sex odds can be observed in the vicinity of the investigated chemical plant where an accident took place.