Presenter/Author Information

M. A. Badri

Keywords

flow pattern, kelvin wave expansion, tidal constituents, persian gulf

Start Date

1-7-2012 12:00 AM

Description

In this paper, data of tidal constituents from co-tidal charts are invoked to determine water surface level and velocity. A procedure is generated to be used as a new hydrodynamic calibration tool for estimating the dynamical field and flow pattern in the Persian Gulf. The four main tidal constituents are selected as M2, S2, K1 and O1. Taking all four constituents together, an approximate flow model is developed to consider the Kelvin wave expansion. Computed values for water surface level and surface layer currents near Kish Island have been compared with measured data from the Iranian Hydrographic center to verify the full hydrodynamic model. Results of the simplified model have been compared with both measurements and a full reference hydrodynamic model to reveal that this calibration approach is a promotion not only towards simplicity, but also towards a speed up of the computation. The final velocity field is composed by flow and wind-induced velocities. A short-term oil spill simulation was undertaken to compare the actual and simulated oil spill drift to interpret the results and prepare data using in risk map analysis.

Share

COinS
 
Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

An Application of Kelvin Wave Expansion to Model Flow Pattern Using in Oil Spill Simulation

In this paper, data of tidal constituents from co-tidal charts are invoked to determine water surface level and velocity. A procedure is generated to be used as a new hydrodynamic calibration tool for estimating the dynamical field and flow pattern in the Persian Gulf. The four main tidal constituents are selected as M2, S2, K1 and O1. Taking all four constituents together, an approximate flow model is developed to consider the Kelvin wave expansion. Computed values for water surface level and surface layer currents near Kish Island have been compared with measured data from the Iranian Hydrographic center to verify the full hydrodynamic model. Results of the simplified model have been compared with both measurements and a full reference hydrodynamic model to reveal that this calibration approach is a promotion not only towards simplicity, but also towards a speed up of the computation. The final velocity field is composed by flow and wind-induced velocities. A short-term oil spill simulation was undertaken to compare the actual and simulated oil spill drift to interpret the results and prepare data using in risk map analysis.