Presenter/Author Information

Rubén Reif
Manel Garrido-Baserba
Manel Poch

Keywords

iedss, knowledge-based methodology, c/n ratio, wastewater treatment, population equivalent

Start Date

1-7-2012 12:00 AM

Description

The Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive 91/271/EEC states that wastewaters from populations higher than 2,000 people equivalent must receive appropriate treatment with the aim of improving the ecological status of the receiving aquatic environment. In this context, ‘appropriate treatment’ is defined as one that fulfils the quality standards set for the receiving waters. This stricter regulation suggest new dimensions of analysis where the affected environments and socioeconomic criteria, together with the characteristics of the available wastewater treatment technologies are to be taken into account for the design of new facilities and the upgrade of existing ones. Thus, in order to deal with this growing complexity, it becomes necessary to acquire and integrate expertise from diverse disciplines. In this paper, a IEDSSs (Intelligent Environmental Decision Support Systems) has been chosen as the most suitable tool to support the identification of the most appropriate wastewater treatment because it integrates expert knowledge together with analytical tools, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach. This paper shows the use of an IEDSS, built according to a knowledge-based methodology, during the decision-making process of selecting feasible treatments and operational strategies for different scenarios characterized by different wastewater composition (C/N ratio), population size (2,000 or 20,000 population equivalent) and specific users requirements (discharge in river or sensitive area, space availability, fiability, operation simplicity, cost-benefit analysis and the use of innovative technologies). For example, the membrane bioreactor was proposed by the IEDSS for scenarios characterized by low space availability and stricter discharge limits (following the requirements of UWTD for sensitive waters). According to the information compiled in the knowledge-bases, the IEDSS also estimated a complete set of outputs such as overall removal efficiencies (nitrogen, phosphorus, organic matter and solids), total cost, sludge production, space requirements, etc.).

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Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

IEDSS as a Tool for the Integrated Assessment of Conventional and Innovative Wastewater Treatment Technologies for Nutrient Removal

The Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive 91/271/EEC states that wastewaters from populations higher than 2,000 people equivalent must receive appropriate treatment with the aim of improving the ecological status of the receiving aquatic environment. In this context, ‘appropriate treatment’ is defined as one that fulfils the quality standards set for the receiving waters. This stricter regulation suggest new dimensions of analysis where the affected environments and socioeconomic criteria, together with the characteristics of the available wastewater treatment technologies are to be taken into account for the design of new facilities and the upgrade of existing ones. Thus, in order to deal with this growing complexity, it becomes necessary to acquire and integrate expertise from diverse disciplines. In this paper, a IEDSSs (Intelligent Environmental Decision Support Systems) has been chosen as the most suitable tool to support the identification of the most appropriate wastewater treatment because it integrates expert knowledge together with analytical tools, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach. This paper shows the use of an IEDSS, built according to a knowledge-based methodology, during the decision-making process of selecting feasible treatments and operational strategies for different scenarios characterized by different wastewater composition (C/N ratio), population size (2,000 or 20,000 population equivalent) and specific users requirements (discharge in river or sensitive area, space availability, fiability, operation simplicity, cost-benefit analysis and the use of innovative technologies). For example, the membrane bioreactor was proposed by the IEDSS for scenarios characterized by low space availability and stricter discharge limits (following the requirements of UWTD for sensitive waters). According to the information compiled in the knowledge-bases, the IEDSS also estimated a complete set of outputs such as overall removal efficiencies (nitrogen, phosphorus, organic matter and solids), total cost, sludge production, space requirements, etc.).