Presenter/Author Information

Thorsten Arnold

Keywords

model lifecycle management, adaptive watershed management, data management, knowledge management

Start Date

1-7-2012 12:00 AM

Description

This paper makes the argument that the lifecycles of numerical models changesdramatically if the paradigm of watershed management (WM) organizations shifts towardadaptive management practices. However, model lifecycle management has not receivedsufficient attention. As a result, WM organizations are struggling to apply numericalmodeling efficiently and cost-effectively under their obligation to promote cyclic learning. Inthis paper, Model Lifecycle Management (MLM) is defined as the process of organizingmodel building and maintenance within organizations. It includes procedural guidelines,standards on commissioning consultant work and deliverables, knowledge managementsuch that relevant knowledge is available to watershed practitioners, and embeddedsoftware solutions that minimize technical knowledge requirements. As a case study, theuse of a visualization and software tool for model management is described, as appliedwithin the Drinking Water Source Protection program of the Province of Ontario (Canada).This program relied heavily on numerical modeling for delineating vulnerable areas aroundmunicipal water supplies and is legislated to update its scientific basis regularly.

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Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

Model Lifecycle Management: Options for a rural watershed practitioners in Ontario

This paper makes the argument that the lifecycles of numerical models changesdramatically if the paradigm of watershed management (WM) organizations shifts towardadaptive management practices. However, model lifecycle management has not receivedsufficient attention. As a result, WM organizations are struggling to apply numericalmodeling efficiently and cost-effectively under their obligation to promote cyclic learning. Inthis paper, Model Lifecycle Management (MLM) is defined as the process of organizingmodel building and maintenance within organizations. It includes procedural guidelines,standards on commissioning consultant work and deliverables, knowledge managementsuch that relevant knowledge is available to watershed practitioners, and embeddedsoftware solutions that minimize technical knowledge requirements. As a case study, theuse of a visualization and software tool for model management is described, as appliedwithin the Drinking Water Source Protection program of the Province of Ontario (Canada).This program relied heavily on numerical modeling for delineating vulnerable areas aroundmunicipal water supplies and is legislated to update its scientific basis regularly.