Keywords

software framework, model interoperability, components, workflow, web services

Start Date

1-7-2012 12:00 AM

Description

This paper presents an overview of the Demeter Framework being developed at the University of Nevada, Reno as part of the Nevada Climate Change Portal. The Demeter Framework proposes a new solution to the model coupling problem by taking a component-based approach that allows almost any standard or type of component to be integrated within the system. For example, the DotSpatial toolbox from Idaho State University is currently being integrated into the Demeter Framework to handle complex geospatial processing, and can then be linked with components from many different sources. The Demeter Framework utilizes flow control and automated data conversions to help manage the issues that arise with non-homogenous component standards. It also encourages usergenerated content that can expand the functionality and availability of components, and as a result will also allow researchers to share their work freely and with very few logistical hindrances. The framework also relies on web service-based components to not only enable access to high-powered computing resources but also to help transcend the programming language and operating system barriers that many software frameworks encounter. The paper provides details on the key architectural concepts and components (activities, translators, channels, and data format converters) that make model and data interoperability possible with Demeter, presents the framework’s Silverlight-based “Persephone” interface designed for user-friendly scenario configuration and execution, describes the workflow runtime web-service being developed, and, finally, provides examples of integration involving WaterOneFlow web services as data sources and DotSpatial toolset items as computational components.

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Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

The Demeter Framework for Model and Data Interoperability

This paper presents an overview of the Demeter Framework being developed at the University of Nevada, Reno as part of the Nevada Climate Change Portal. The Demeter Framework proposes a new solution to the model coupling problem by taking a component-based approach that allows almost any standard or type of component to be integrated within the system. For example, the DotSpatial toolbox from Idaho State University is currently being integrated into the Demeter Framework to handle complex geospatial processing, and can then be linked with components from many different sources. The Demeter Framework utilizes flow control and automated data conversions to help manage the issues that arise with non-homogenous component standards. It also encourages usergenerated content that can expand the functionality and availability of components, and as a result will also allow researchers to share their work freely and with very few logistical hindrances. The framework also relies on web service-based components to not only enable access to high-powered computing resources but also to help transcend the programming language and operating system barriers that many software frameworks encounter. The paper provides details on the key architectural concepts and components (activities, translators, channels, and data format converters) that make model and data interoperability possible with Demeter, presents the framework’s Silverlight-based “Persephone” interface designed for user-friendly scenario configuration and execution, describes the workflow runtime web-service being developed, and, finally, provides examples of integration involving WaterOneFlow web services as data sources and DotSpatial toolset items as computational components.