Presenter/Author Information

William Silvert

Keywords

decision support, stakeholder participation, aquaculture siting

Start Date

1-7-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Decision Support Systems (DSS) offer more transparency than traditionalmodelling approaches but are designed for use by government agents to use in theregulatory process. Stakeholders are in the position of looking over the shoulder of theperson in charge, and while this is better than just waiting for answers it still separates themfrom the modelling process. If stakeholders were actually able to operate a DSS bythemselves it could increase transparency, build confidence, and create possibilities for newapproaches to environmentally significant developments which could benefit all partiesconcerned. This talk describes three simple DSS programs for aquaculture siting, two forfinfish and one for shellfish, which are designed in such a way that they not only provideinformation relevant to the regulatory process but also can be used by fish farmers, NGOsand other interested parties to evaluate potential activities from their individualperspectives. For example, a fish farmer could use a DSS in private to explore potentialsfor site development without having to prepare a detailed proposal in advance and withouthaving to share proprietary information with government scientists or anyone else.Furthermore the use of a publicly available DSS would lessen concerns about bias andpreference in the regulation of the industry and could contribute to an attitude of mutualtrust which might decrease the potential for social conflict about potential harmfuldevelopments.

Share

COinS
 
Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

Decision Support for Stakeholders

Decision Support Systems (DSS) offer more transparency than traditionalmodelling approaches but are designed for use by government agents to use in theregulatory process. Stakeholders are in the position of looking over the shoulder of theperson in charge, and while this is better than just waiting for answers it still separates themfrom the modelling process. If stakeholders were actually able to operate a DSS bythemselves it could increase transparency, build confidence, and create possibilities for newapproaches to environmentally significant developments which could benefit all partiesconcerned. This talk describes three simple DSS programs for aquaculture siting, two forfinfish and one for shellfish, which are designed in such a way that they not only provideinformation relevant to the regulatory process but also can be used by fish farmers, NGOsand other interested parties to evaluate potential activities from their individualperspectives. For example, a fish farmer could use a DSS in private to explore potentialsfor site development without having to prepare a detailed proposal in advance and withouthaving to share proprietary information with government scientists or anyone else.Furthermore the use of a publicly available DSS would lessen concerns about bias andpreference in the regulation of the industry and could contribute to an attitude of mutualtrust which might decrease the potential for social conflict about potential harmfuldevelopments.