Presenter/Author Information

Daniel P. Loucks

Start Date

1-7-2006 12:00 AM

Description

The models discussed in this workshop have many features in common, and some that differ. All are what we commonly call decision support systems for analyzing alternative water, and, in some cases, watershed management alternatives. All are interactive, i.e., they use graphic interfaces and are menu driven. After some training interested stakeholders can explore questions and assumptions using these tools. Each model is designed to be flexible enough to fit most if not all water resource systems no matter where located. Each is a tool that can be used, at least as a first step, in the identification and evaluation of alternative management policies and practices. Just how well models like these have met their goals in their many applications is the subject of this workshop. The purpose of this workshop is to identify weaknesses and research and development needs that can lead us toward more effective models for addressing current and potential future management issues. The paragraphs that follow briefly describe five of the models that will be demonstrated and discussed in this workshop. These include MIKE BASIN from Danish Hydraulics Institute, MODSIM from Colorado State University, RIBASIM from Delft Hydraulics, WaBaMo from WASY, and WEAP from Tellus Institute. We welcome the presentation of others as well.

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Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

Generic Simulation Models for Facilitating Stakeholder Involvement in Water Resources Planning and Management

The models discussed in this workshop have many features in common, and some that differ. All are what we commonly call decision support systems for analyzing alternative water, and, in some cases, watershed management alternatives. All are interactive, i.e., they use graphic interfaces and are menu driven. After some training interested stakeholders can explore questions and assumptions using these tools. Each model is designed to be flexible enough to fit most if not all water resource systems no matter where located. Each is a tool that can be used, at least as a first step, in the identification and evaluation of alternative management policies and practices. Just how well models like these have met their goals in their many applications is the subject of this workshop. The purpose of this workshop is to identify weaknesses and research and development needs that can lead us toward more effective models for addressing current and potential future management issues. The paragraphs that follow briefly describe five of the models that will be demonstrated and discussed in this workshop. These include MIKE BASIN from Danish Hydraulics Institute, MODSIM from Colorado State University, RIBASIM from Delft Hydraulics, WaBaMo from WASY, and WEAP from Tellus Institute. We welcome the presentation of others as well.