Presenter/Author Information

Robert N. Stewart
S. Tom Purucker

Keywords

software, decision, environment, geostatistics, sample design

Start Date

1-7-2006 12:00 AM

Description

Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is a Windows freeware program that incorporates tools from environmental assessment into an effective problem-solving environment. SADA was developed by the Institute for Environmental Modeling at the University of Tennessee and includes integrated modules for GIS, visualization, geospatial analysis, statistical analysis, human health and ecological risk assessment, cost/benefit analysis, sampling design, and decision support. SADA began in the middle 1990s as a simple tool for integrating human health risk with spatial modeling tools. Since then, SADA has continued as an evolving freeware product targeted to individuals needing the integration or expansion of existing models into a spatial context. Because of the varied user base, SADA was engineered with an open and highly scaleable environment that in most cases allows additional functionality without an apparent increase in complexity. As a result, applications of SADA have extended into other disciplines that place strong emphasis on the spatial distribution of data. This paper provides an overview of the central functions of SADA and discusses how we addressed the problem of presenting complex and integrated models in a tractable manner. Information on SADA and a free download of the program can be found at http://www.tiem.utk.edu/~sada/.

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Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

SADA: A Freeware Decision Support Tool Integrating GIS, Sample design, Spatial Modeling, and Risk Assessment

Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is a Windows freeware program that incorporates tools from environmental assessment into an effective problem-solving environment. SADA was developed by the Institute for Environmental Modeling at the University of Tennessee and includes integrated modules for GIS, visualization, geospatial analysis, statistical analysis, human health and ecological risk assessment, cost/benefit analysis, sampling design, and decision support. SADA began in the middle 1990s as a simple tool for integrating human health risk with spatial modeling tools. Since then, SADA has continued as an evolving freeware product targeted to individuals needing the integration or expansion of existing models into a spatial context. Because of the varied user base, SADA was engineered with an open and highly scaleable environment that in most cases allows additional functionality without an apparent increase in complexity. As a result, applications of SADA have extended into other disciplines that place strong emphasis on the spatial distribution of data. This paper provides an overview of the central functions of SADA and discusses how we addressed the problem of presenting complex and integrated models in a tractable manner. Information on SADA and a free download of the program can be found at http://www.tiem.utk.edu/~sada/.