Keywords

integrated modelling, agroforestry, salinity, integrated catchment management

Start Date

1-7-2004 12:00 AM

Description

Soil salinity is a major problem in Northeastern Thailand as a result of the interaction of groundwater flow systems with widespread deposits of rock salt. Successful salinity management would involve changing land use and water balances at a regional scale with a time scale of 30 to 50 years. The scientific issue requires multidisciplinary cooperation including hydrologists, hydrogeologists, agronomists and economic and social researchers. A major issue is the real complexity of the quantitative relationships driving salinity under different environments and the uncertainty resulting from data limitations. This requires that modelling frameworks be open and accessible to a range of disciplines as well as allowing flexibility in coefficient values. This paper reports on interdisciplinary research in progress on salinity and land use in Northeastern Thailand using a combination of bio-economic modelling to assess the socioeconomic impacts of changing land uses, including the use of agroforestry to manage salinity, and groundwater modelling. Models that were derived originally to support the investigation of salinity in the Liverpool Plains of New South Wales, Australia have been redeveloped for application to Northeastern Thailand. The earlier models used the GAMSÔ language but the current modelling is being developed in EXCELÔ and MODFLOWÔ for ease of use. Preliminary results of the modelling indicate that the saline land area will increase under a “do nothing” scenario, from the present 13% of land area to 24% in 30 years. The optimal land use would include more rice cultivation and plantation forestry, with less cassava growing compared to present land use.

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Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

Land Use and Hydrological Management: ICHAM, an Integrated Model at a Regional Scale in Northeastern Thailand

Soil salinity is a major problem in Northeastern Thailand as a result of the interaction of groundwater flow systems with widespread deposits of rock salt. Successful salinity management would involve changing land use and water balances at a regional scale with a time scale of 30 to 50 years. The scientific issue requires multidisciplinary cooperation including hydrologists, hydrogeologists, agronomists and economic and social researchers. A major issue is the real complexity of the quantitative relationships driving salinity under different environments and the uncertainty resulting from data limitations. This requires that modelling frameworks be open and accessible to a range of disciplines as well as allowing flexibility in coefficient values. This paper reports on interdisciplinary research in progress on salinity and land use in Northeastern Thailand using a combination of bio-economic modelling to assess the socioeconomic impacts of changing land uses, including the use of agroforestry to manage salinity, and groundwater modelling. Models that were derived originally to support the investigation of salinity in the Liverpool Plains of New South Wales, Australia have been redeveloped for application to Northeastern Thailand. The earlier models used the GAMSÔ language but the current modelling is being developed in EXCELÔ and MODFLOWÔ for ease of use. Preliminary results of the modelling indicate that the saline land area will increase under a “do nothing” scenario, from the present 13% of land area to 24% in 30 years. The optimal land use would include more rice cultivation and plantation forestry, with less cassava growing compared to present land use.