Presenter/Author Information

O. Giustolisi
A. Doglioni
Dragan Savic
B. W. Webb

Keywords

data reconstruction, knowledge discovery in data, environmental modelling, evolutionary computing, evolutionary polynomial regression

Start Date

1-7-2004 12:00 AM

Description

This paper introduces a novel data-driven methodology named Evolutionary Polynomial Regression (EPR), which permits the multi-purpose modelling of physical phenomena, through the simultaneous solution of a number of models. Multipurpose modelling or “multi-modelling”, enables the user to make a more robust choice of those models aimed at (a) the knowledge based on data modelling, (b) on-line and offline forecasting, and (c) data augmentation (i.e. infilling of missing data in time series). This methodology is particularly useful in modelling environmental phenomena, for which it is usually impossible to obtain physical data at a laboratory scale. In particular, the non-linearity of phenomena and non Gaussian nature of background noise make on-line forecasting complex, and where data are available, they often contain discontinuities (i.e. missing data). The use of EPR in modelling and analysis is illustrated by application to a case study containing all these limitations. The application of EPR to thermal behaviour of a stream gives not only a good physical insight of the phenomenon, but also allows infilling of missing data, resulting in good models that forecast the water temperature.

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Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

A Multi-Model Approach to Analysis of Environmental Phenomena

This paper introduces a novel data-driven methodology named Evolutionary Polynomial Regression (EPR), which permits the multi-purpose modelling of physical phenomena, through the simultaneous solution of a number of models. Multipurpose modelling or “multi-modelling”, enables the user to make a more robust choice of those models aimed at (a) the knowledge based on data modelling, (b) on-line and offline forecasting, and (c) data augmentation (i.e. infilling of missing data in time series). This methodology is particularly useful in modelling environmental phenomena, for which it is usually impossible to obtain physical data at a laboratory scale. In particular, the non-linearity of phenomena and non Gaussian nature of background noise make on-line forecasting complex, and where data are available, they often contain discontinuities (i.e. missing data). The use of EPR in modelling and analysis is illustrated by application to a case study containing all these limitations. The application of EPR to thermal behaviour of a stream gives not only a good physical insight of the phenomenon, but also allows infilling of missing data, resulting in good models that forecast the water temperature.