Presenter/Author Information

Stefan Salhofer
Gudrun Wassermann
Erwin Binner

Keywords

strategic environmental assessment, lca, participation, waste management

Start Date

1-7-2004 12:00 AM

Description

A Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is conducted to ensure that the environmentalconsequences of plans or programs (land use programs, traffic planning, waste management planning etc.) areidentified and assessed. Participation is a mandatory element of the SEA process. All affected parties arerequired to be represented in the process. Until today, the SEA process has been applied to wastemanagement in only a few cases. This paper describes the assessment of a waste management plan in theprovince of Salzburg, Austria. The process took place in 2003. As in other cases of SEA, several alternativeswere considered and assessed. Participation involved the establishment of a project team including all therelevant authorities and institutions and two expert teams. All decisions throughout the process (e.g. selectionof the framework, scenarios and indicators), had to be taken by a majority of the project team. The aim of theprocess was to pinpoint the pros and cons of the different scenarios rather than identify the “best solution.”This paper describes the process and highlights the critical points.

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Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) as a Participatory Approach to Environmental Planning Experiences from a case study with SEA in waste management

A Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is conducted to ensure that the environmentalconsequences of plans or programs (land use programs, traffic planning, waste management planning etc.) areidentified and assessed. Participation is a mandatory element of the SEA process. All affected parties arerequired to be represented in the process. Until today, the SEA process has been applied to wastemanagement in only a few cases. This paper describes the assessment of a waste management plan in theprovince of Salzburg, Austria. The process took place in 2003. As in other cases of SEA, several alternativeswere considered and assessed. Participation involved the establishment of a project team including all therelevant authorities and institutions and two expert teams. All decisions throughout the process (e.g. selectionof the framework, scenarios and indicators), had to be taken by a majority of the project team. The aim of theprocess was to pinpoint the pros and cons of the different scenarios rather than identify the “best solution.”This paper describes the process and highlights the critical points.