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Poster ID #339

Abstract

Stress is a part of everyday life. One important way that stress influences our health is by increasing blood pressure. Research has consistently reported that foreign‐born Mexicans have lower blood pressure than Caucasians 1. This surprises many, since foreign‐born Mexicans are typically more socioeconomically under advantaged 2. Numerous psychosocial factors such as social support and perceived control have been shown to moderate this socioeconomic status (SES)‐health gradient3, but surprisingly li1le work has been done examining how perceived stress and coping strategies influence this relationship. The current study seeks to examine how the psychological factors of perceived stress and coping influence foreign‐born Mexican Americans and Caucasians. It is hypothesized that: 1. If foreign‐born Mexican Americans have lower blood pressure, then they will perceive less stress. 2. Similarly, if foreign‐born Mexican Americans have lower blood pressure and less perceived stress, then they will also use more adaptive ways of coping.

Description

The Annual Mary Lou Fulton Mentored Research Conference showcases some of the best student research from the College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences. The mentored learning program encourages undergraduate students to participate in hands-on and practical research under the direction of a faculty member. Students create these posters as an aide in presenting the results of their research to the public, faculty, and their peers.

Publication Date

2010-04-01

Permanent URL

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/2237

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Psychology

Don't deny it: Cultural patterns in coping with stress

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Psychology Commons

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