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Keywords

Poster ID #371

Abstract

Greenery is an important part of any urban environment. Besides being visually appealing, landscaping performs important ecological functions such as food and habitats for some creatures and cooling effects for the urban ecosystem. For these and other reasons, places with green lawns and mature trees are highly desirable. Landscaping, however, is not cheap. Planting and maintaining appropriate trees, shrubbery, or grasses can be costly to private homeowners, businesses, or municipalities. This can result in unequal amounts of trees and other greenery between rich and less affluent communities, and a disparity between rich and poor neighborhoods within the same city. Using remote sensing, GIS, and landscape ecology methods, we hope to determine whether or not there are significant differences in the quantity and quality of greenery in wealthy and less affluent neighborhoods within Utah County.

Description

The Annual Mary Lou Fulton Mentored Research Conference showcases some of the best student research from the College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences. The mentored learning program encourages undergraduate students to participate in hands-on and practical research under the direction of a faculty member. Students create these posters as an aide in presenting the results of their research to the public, faculty, and their peers.

Publication Date

2010-04-01

Permanent URL

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/2260

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Geography

Does More Green equal More Green?: A Comparison of Vegetation in Rich and Poor Neighborhoods in Utah County

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Geography Commons

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