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Poster ID #355

Abstract

A job promotion or an increase in supervisory responsibility is typically seen as something to be congratulated; but could there actually be a dark side to it? Due to few previous studies regarding this topic in relation to women and mothers, the subject was of great interest to us. Our findings revealed that job change and increased supervisory responsibilities had a negative association with depression levels. Marriage, number of children, and dual-earner households were also negatively associated with levels of depression. Women with more children also had significantly lower levels of depression than men or women without children. Further research into the topic may reveal other hidden factors affecting depression levels that may still be lurking underneath the corporate ladder.

Description

The Annual Mary Lou Fulton Mentored Research Conference showcases some of the best student research from the College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences. The mentored learning program encourages undergraduate students to participate in hands-on and practical research under the direction of a faculty member. Students create these posters as an aide in presenting the results of their research to the public, faculty, and their peers.

Publication Date

2010-04-01

Permanent URL

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/2248

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology

Rising to the Top (and Hitting Rock Bottom): A Look into the Relationship between Promotion and Depression

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Sociology Commons

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