Abstract

By definition, children with autism have deficits in communication. Often, when parents notice that something is "different" about their child, it is that he does not acquire language at the same rate as his peers, that the child uses what language he has in an idiosyncratic fashion (e.g., repeating phrases from videos, using pronouns incorrectly), or that the child appears to understand only that language which might be reinforcing to him (e.g., not responding to "Look at Mommy," but responding to "Do you want a cookie?)" When these "red flags" are apparent, parents should beware of misguided advice such as "Don't worry. He'll grow out of it." Patterns of communicative behavior are developed early, and if left to chance, the child is not likely to "grow" out of delayed or deviant patterns. The child must be specifically taught to become a successful communicator.

Original Publication Citation

Dyches, T. T. (21). Language acquisition in children with autism. Utah Special Educator, 21(4), 14-15.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2001-02-01

Permanent URL

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/2927

Publisher

Utah Personnel Development Center (UPDC)

Language

English

College

David O. McKay School of Education

Department

Counseling Psychology and Special Education

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