Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between family downhill skiing patterns and family functioning. The Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale (FACES II), was used to measure family functioning. Questions created by the researcher were used to measure the average number of family ski experiences per year (frequency) and how many years the family has skied together (duration). Satisfaction with family ski experiences was measured using the Satisfaction with Family Skiing Scale. The sample consisted of 110 family units from throughout the United States. The findings from this study found that frequency and duration of family ski experiences were not significant predictors of family functioning. The data did determine that satisfaction with family ski experiences was a significant predictor of family functioning from the youth, parent, and family perspectives.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Marriott School of Management; Recreation Management

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2007-03-21

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd1773

Keywords

cohesion, adaptability, family functioning, shared family activities, skiing, outdoor recreation, leisure satisfaction

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