Abstract

The small, above-ground masonry structures of northwestern New Mexico called "pueblitos" first came to the attention of anthropologists in over a century ago. In 1920, the noted archaeologist A.V. Kidder hypothesized that these masonry structures might have been built by Puebloan refugees fleeing Spanish reprisals in the wake of the Spanish reconquest of New Mexico after the Pueblo Revolt, and he proposed that this hypothesis be tested. Over the next several decades, however, the hypothesis remained untested, but it became both accepted as established fact and the basis for most anthropological, archaeological, and historical reconstructions of Navajo history and cultural development.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Anthropology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2004-03-19

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd390

Keywords

archaeology, archeology, Navajo, Dinetah, ceramics, architecture, settlement patterns, community organization, Palluche Canyon, New Mexico, Pueblo Revolt, oral history, ethnohistory, Navajo history, pueblito, pueblitos, ethnic co-residence, Towa, Tewa, Tapacito, terrestrial photogrammetry, Largo Canyon, refugee hypothesis

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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