Abstract

Research indicates that general and mental healthcare services have been, and continue to be, underutilized by racial and ethnic minorities. Studies point to the language gap between limited English proficiency (LEP) individuals and mental-health clinicians as one of the factors in perpetuating that gap. Despite the legal and professional mandates that require professionals in healthcare to provide and use language interpreters in giving care, psychologists rarely make use of professional interpreters when conducting psychotherapy. Most clinicians have little experience providing mental-health treatment across differences in language, and it is supposed that clinicians usually receive little or no training on how to address those differences. This study involved a national survey of all APA-accredited programs to ascertain how student trainees are currently being prepared to work with language interpreters in professional training programs and to evaluate potential barriers to the implementation of training guidelines for use in those programs. Findings indicated that several instructors are addressing the use of language interpreters through a variety of pedagogical approaches. Guidelines for clinical practice with interpreters were also evaluated and ranked so as to establish consensus on the necessary competencies. Implications for instructors are also included.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2016-04-01

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd8555

Keywords

psychotherapy, interpreter, translation, foreign language, language, training

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