Abstract

This is a case study that investigates the experiences of eight friendless seventh grade students as they transition from elementary school to junior high. In an effort to examine the wide-range of experiences of friendless students, I explored and compared the experiences of students who have high social self efficacy and students who have low self-efficacy. Each student was interviewed two times and both interviews were analyzed using a priori codes of when and where students felt isolated and distressed. The interviews were also analyzed using an open coding method looking for emergent codes. The study highlights and illustrates what each student expresses about their experiences in terms of isolation, friendship, and belonging. The cases show that peer group disruption, introversion and extroversion, the role of the adult at school, and family dynamics affect the experiences of the participants. Findings of the study suggest that schools need to plan and organize different types of spaces for friendless students to meet and connect with peers.

Degree

MA

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Teacher Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2016-12-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd9005

Keywords

social self-efficacy, transition to secondary school, transition to middle school, friendless

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