Abstract

An antibody microarray consists of antibody bound to a surface. Antibody microarrays have great potential in many fields, particularly as a tool to detect antigens. Unfortunately, antibodies suffer from poor performance. A greater understanding of how antibodies interact with surfaces would improve microarray design and performance, but experimental methods fall short of being able to observe these interactions. Therefore molecular simulation has emerged as the primary method to study protein/surface interactions.The simulations here were coarse grain simulations performed using the model of Karanicolas and Brooks. Additionally, an advanced surface model was used that allows for different surface chemistries. PyMBAR analysis was used to find heat capacities and determine relative stabilities of different linkers and tethering sites for the antibody/surface system.The actual work looked at how 24 different tethering sites affect antibody stability on two different surfaces and examined nine linkers varying in length and rigidity. Ultimately the findings were that antibody stability is a function of tethering position when tethered to a hydrophobic surface, but not when tethered to a hydrophilic surface. Furthermore, the length and rigidity of the linkers do not have a significant impact on stability.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology; Chemical Engineering

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2016-12-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd8989

Keywords

microarrays, antibodies, coarse-grain simulations

Share

COinS