Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between strength training and body composition before and after controlling for several covariates. A cross-sectional study including 257 female subjects was conducted. METHODS: Subjects' level of involvement in strength training was determined via questionnaire. Body composition was assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Diet was assessed using 7-d weighed food records. RESULTS: Strong linear relationships between subjects' level of involvement in strength training and body composition were identified. For each additional day of strength training reported per week, body fat was 1.32 percentage points lower (F = 14.8, p = 0.0002) and fat-free mass was 656.4 g (1.45 lb) higher (F = 18.9, p < 0.0001), on average. Likewise, the more time subjects spent lifting and the more intensely they trained, the better their body composition tended to be. Adjusting for differences in age, menopause status, objectively measured physical activity, energy intake, and protein intake tended to weaken each association. Controlling for differences in physical activity weakened each relationship the most. CONCLUSION: Women who strength train regularly tend to have significantly lower body fat percentages and significantly higher levels of fat-free mass compared to their counterparts, regardless of differences in several potential confounding variables.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Life Sciences; Exercise Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2015-11-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd8133

Keywords

weight lifting, resistance training, body fat, exercise, protein, fitness

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