Abstract

Advances in digital technology have recently allowed for richer text annotation in combination with authentic second language video media. As a result, many educational researchers are focusing increased attention on the effect this application of technology can have on second language acquisition. This study examines the comparative effectiveness of target vocabulary treatments with either native language (L1) definitions or target language (L2) definitions when target vocabulary is presented in either kana or kanji as a part of the subtitles of an L2 film based on participant performance on vocabulary assessments. This study also examines the participants' perceived levels of helpfulness of the varying word treatments. The results of the study suggest that providing annotations for target words in the L2 increases learning of that word more than L1 annotations for intermediate learners of Japanese. On the other hand, learners rated access to definitions in L1 as more helpful than L2 definitions, and they expressed their preference for understanding the story more than learning the target vocabulary.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; Center for Language Studies

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2016-06-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd8639

Keywords

L1, L2, kanji, kana, word treatment, word definition, dictionary, gloss, annotation, Japanese, intermediate learner, learner perspective

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