Abstract

Secondary art education programs primarily offer courses in traditional mediums like drawing, painting, sculpture, and ceramics. In addition to valuing these traditional art forms, art education research supports integrating new technologies and media in the classroom. However, the possibilities of creating an exclusively contemporary, new genres curriculum have yet to be explored. This study examines the affordances and limitations of a high school-level new genre curriculum and describes how students reacted to these new genres and how their perceptions of art, student-peer relationships, and artist identities changed over time. By introducing students to new genres, the author found students expanded their definitions of art, became excited about art, and created personally relevant and meaningful artwork. The results of this case study may be valuable to art educators desiring to integrate more contemporary art into their curriculum.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Fine Arts and Communications; Art

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2015-12-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd8274

Keywords

new genre, contemporary art, secondary, curriculum, case study

Included in

Art Practice Commons

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