Abstract

This study explores the influence of religion on gender roles in marriage. Past research indicates that previous theories of marital power have ignored couples' own conceptualizations and have relied on taken for granted assumptions. Thirty-two religious couples (from Christian, Jewish, and Muslim faiths) were interviewed regarding their gender roles. Grounded-theory qualitative analyses were conducted for couples' perceptions of religious influence on gender roles, the development of their gender practice, and their operationalization of marital power. Results are reported according to couples' discussion of role organization, role design, and outcomes. Valuing gender differences moderated religious impact on couples' role development and power balance. Traditional couples indicated that gender differences were important to them and that religion was a major factor in their role organization. Non-traditional couples were more likely to see religion as oppressive to women and report that marital roles were equitable because they were not determined by gender.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Family Life; Marriage, Family, and Human Development

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2004-07-17

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd512

Keywords

marital power, marriage, religion, gender, gender roles, role organization, Christian, Jewish, Muslim

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