Abstract

The fate of Susan Pevensie has been one of the most controversial and interesting topics of debate about The Chronicles of Narnia since readers realized that she was no longer a friend of Narnia. Many critics have condemned C. S. Lewis for being sexist, thus making the stereotypically feminine Susan with her love of parties, nylons, and lipstick ineligible for salvation. This thesis proposes to look at Susan's choices and fate from the perspective of moral imagination. It argues that Lewis did not bar Susan from heaven to belittle femininity, but rather to comment on the consequences of choice, belief, and the vital exercise of moral imagination. Placing Susan in a fairy-tale world highlights the differences between what is real and what seems impossible and pushes both Susan and the readers to develop their own moral imagination in the pursuit of belief in the truth. Looking at Susan's ambiguous fate and comparing her story to other characters' journeys throughout the series shows readers the power of the imagination and offers hope that Susan, like the rest of her siblings, may make it to Aslan's Country after all.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; English

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2016-06-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd8731

Keywords

moral imagination, belief, choose, Susan Pevensie

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