Abstract

Using waves two and three of the National Survey of Adolescent Males (1990 and 1995) I examine the effects of marriage, paternity and father involvement on the use of drugs and alcohol by young men. Despite the importance of fatherhood as an adult role, I argue that commitment to the role of fatherhood and not paternity itself is what alters behavior. I hypothesize that young men who assume responsibility for fathering their children are more likely to reduce their drug and alcohol use over time than young men who father children but do not assume the role of parent. Results show that the assumption of adult roles and father involvement affect drug and alcohol use differently. Paternity is found to deter alcohol use independent of marriage, while marriage reduces illicit drug use. Closer examination of paternity and alcohol use supports my hypothesis that father involvement is associated with decreased alcohol use. Young men residing with their children were also more likely to smoke infrequently than non-resident uninvolved fathers.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Sociology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2005-07-14

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd941

Keywords

Father Involvement, Drug and Alcohol Use, Young Adults, Adult Roles, Unmarried Fathers

Included in

Sociology Commons

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