Abstract

Emily Dickinson's poetry functions where scientific attention to the physical world and abstract theorizing about the ineffable intersect. Critics who emphasize the poet's dedication to the scientific often take for granted how deeply the uncertainty that underlies all of Dickinson's poetry opposes scientific discussion of the day. Meteorology is an exceptional nineteenth-century science because it takes as its subject complex systems which are inexplicable in Newtonian terms. As such, meteorology can articulate the ways that Dickinson bridges the divide between the unknown and the known, particularly as she relates to the interplay of nature and culture, the role of careful observation in the face of uncertainty, and issues of home and dwelling. These are themes integral to and further elaborated by contemporary ecocritical discourse.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; English

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2015-12-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd8146

Keywords

Emily Dickinson, poetry, meteorology, ecocriticism, ecopoetics, nineteenth-century science

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