Abstract

Objective- To investigate the extent to which changes in body fat percentage (BF%) and weight (BW) relate to changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) in women, while statistically controlling for possible confounders, such as age, initial body weight, and menopause status.

Methods and Results- A cohort of 150 free-living subjects was followed prospectively over a 2½-year period. BF% was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), while BW was determined with a calibrated, electronic scale. There was no significant relationship between changes in BF% and CRP, regardless of age, initial BW, and menopause status. However, changes in BW were predictive of changes in CRP (F=7.75, p=0.006, R2=0.05). The association remained significant after adjusting for differences in baseline age, initial BW, and menopause status (F=9.17, p=0.003, R2=0.08).

Conclusions- Changes in BF% are not predictive of changes in CRP. However, in agreement with other studies, variations in BW are predictive of changes in CRP. Evidently, changes in CRP are more a function of changes in BW than changes in BF% in middle-aged women. If a causal relationship is assumed, then weight gain over time is likely to increase risk of elevated CRP levels and possibly cardiovascular disease.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Life Sciences; Exercise Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2005-07-12

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd929

Keywords

C-Reactive Protein, Body Fat Percentage, Body Weight

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