Abstract

Students do not always evaluate explanations based on the mathematics despite their teacher's effort to be the guide-on-the-side and delegate evaluation to the students. This case study examined how the use of three features of the Discourse—authority, sociomathematical norms, and classroom mathematical practices—impacted students' evaluation and contributed to students' failure to evaluate. By studying three pre-service elementary school students' evaluation methods, it was found that the students applied different types of each of the features of the Discourse and employed them at different times. The way that the features of the Discourse were used contributed to some of the difficulties that the participants experienced in their evaluation of explanations. The results suggest that researchers in the field must come to believe that resistance to teaching methods is not the only reason for student failure to evaluate mathematical explanations and that authority is operating in the classroom even when the teacher is acting as the guide on the side. The framework developed for the study will be valuable for researchers who continue to use for their investigation of individual student's participation in mathematical activity.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Physical and Mathematical Sciences; Mathematics Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2015-08-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd8076

Keywords

mathematics education, evaluation, authority, sociomathematical norms, classroom mathematical practices, inquiry-based teaching

Share

COinS