Abstract

This study sought to determine why only about one half of the potential Latter-day Saint students in grades nine through twelve in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area enroll in early morning seminary each year, why so many students attended poorly or discontinued part way through 1973-74, and what effect the increase in the price of gasoline had on attendance. About 40 percent of the potential students and their parents, all eight of their bishops, and all thirteen seminary teachers responded to a mailed questionnaire.

The main reasons for non-enrollment were inactivity in the LDS Church, disinterest in seminary, and difficulty finding dependable rides because of distance. The main reasons for low attendance were losing interest in seminary, partly due to lack of teacher interest out of class; being too tired, partly because of the early seminary hour; and transportation problems, due to distance and lack of parental support.

Degree

MRE

College and Department

Religious Education; Church History and Doctrine

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1975

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm670

Keywords

School attendance, Mormon Church, Seminaries

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