Abstract

The Indian agent, the trapper, or the citizens of small Iowa townships were undoubtedly startled to see such a large movement of people and wagons across the state of Iowa. It was the winter and early spring of 1846. The onlooker would have seen men, women, and children muffled against the wintry blast, walking or riding in covered wagons and lesser vehicles. Somehow these people were different from the occasional companies bound for points West. Many were ill equipped. Many had a look of gentility, or as the frontiersman might say, a "citified look." They kept to themselves and often withdrew from outside influences as if they expected trouble to fall upon them from some source. Indeed, they seemed "peculiar."

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; History

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1953

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm653

Keywords

Mormon Church, History, 1846

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