Abstract

This thesis explores Mormon women's experiences with death as revealed in their personal writings from 1847-1900. The study includes an examination of women's involvement in caring for the sick and tending to the dead, as well as an exploration of women's personal reactions to death. A careful reading of Mormon women's writings from this period reveals that Mormonism equipped believers with powerful doctrines and rituals which helped women cope with the sorrow and profound grief that accompanied the deaths of those they loved. In addition, members living in Mormon communities rendered invaluable physical, emotional, and spiritual support to each other as they cared for the sick and dying, prepared the dead for burial, and dealt with the lingering sense of loss brought on by death. Significantly, special community-sanctioned customs and traditions associated with illness and death provided solace in difficult times.

Degree

MA

College and Department

David M. Kennedy Center

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1995

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm639

Keywords

Mormon women, Eliza Maria Partridge Lyman, 1820-1886