Abstract

The history of Utah's Territorial Capitol Building at Fillmore began in 1851 when Brigham Young desired a central location for the capital of the newly created Territory. Only one wing of the four wing plan was completed, because misunderstandings had arisen between Mormon and Federal officials that prevented further finances from being sent to Utah, and only one complete session of the Legislature met at Fillmore, in December 1855. Two one-day sessions were held there in December 1856 and December 1858. The 1856 session adjourned to Salt Lake until the Federal Government would send funds for the completion of the capitol, and the 1858 session complied with a ruling that Fillmore was the real Territorial seat of government; however, after a short session the officials adjourned permanently to Salt Lake because it was more conveniently located. During the seventy-two years between the time it was discontinued as the Territorial Capitol in 1858 and was dedicated as a museum in 1930, the building served Fillmore in various capacities. The growth of a museum from 1930 to 1969 restored the capitol to a new role, and plans for the future included more publicity for the building.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; History

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1971

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm568

Keywords

Territorial Statehouse, Fillmore, Utah, History, Politics, government, 19th century, Mormons, Political activity

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