Abstract

The approach of the transcontinental railroad in 1869 posed several real and imagined threats to the Mormon Kingdom in the Great Basin. The Pacific Railroad ended Mormon geographic isolation and brought economic competition from the States. The railroad also made it possible for miners to get to the gold fields faster and with the heave equipment necessary to make Utah mining profitable. Sensing the political problems and the social and moral evils that would accompany the railroad, the Mormon leaders, in hopes of meeting these problems, counseled to extend their economic goal of self-sufficiency. Through stepped-up cooperation and unity they felt this could be accomplished.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; History

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1968

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm560

Keywords

Church of Zion

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