Abstract

Two control groups and two experimental groups of missionaries and teachers participated in a study comparing a grammar-based method of teaching to a context-based method. The study lasted for two weeks during June 1997. Each classroom was recorded using a timing-based observation system that captured 13 missionary and teacher language behaviors. The behaviors were recorded in real time and later evaluated to determine in which classroom setting the most real communication occurred. A second purpose was to determine the effectiveness of teacher training with respect to teachers in the experimental group. Findings revealed that missionaries in the context-based classroom received and participated in a significantly greater amount of meaningful language interactions, while missionaries in the control groups spend a significantly greater amount of time participating in rote-type language interactions. Furthermore, data suggests that by training the experimental teachers, their confidence and teaching ability improved. Data also suggested a relation between teacher language behaviors and missionary behaviors. Suggestions are made regarding further application of the context-based curriculum and teacher training and observation mechanisms as to what developers will need to include in a broader implementation of this study.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; Center for Language Studies

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2000

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm544

Keywords

Mormon missionaries, Training, Mormon Church, Missionary system, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Missions

Share

COinS