Abstract

In this thesis project, the relationship between attitudes toward target and native culture groups and attained ESL proficiency among immigrants was evaluated. The subjects were thirty adult native Swedes, all members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, who had spent an average of 29 years in the United States. Fourteen were members of a Swedish-speaking branch, while sixteen were members of English-speaking wards. Significant differences were found in immigrants' attitudes toward the culture groups. High English proficiency related positively with a more positive attitude toward the target culture group. Those demonstrating high proficiency viewed the general native culture group more negatively than those demonstrating low proficiency. Immigrants belonging to the Swedish branch scored significantly lower on the test and so did those with Swedish spouses, over the age of 30 at the time of immigration and those who had not had any English training in Sweden. These groups also perceived themselves as less intelligent and less confident than their companion groups.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; Linguistics and English Language

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1981

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm532

Keywords

English language, Study, teaching, Swedish speakers, Emigration, immigration, Religious aspects, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

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