Abstract

The history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Japan from 1948 to 1980 is a study in cross-cultural interaction. Compared to the earlier attempts of the Church in proselytizing the Japanese in the period 1901 to 1924, there are some significant contrasts. The earlier mission is seen as an attempt by a small, relatively unknown, provincial religion, in financial straits, just emerging into the twentieth century, trying to establish itself in a non-christian, fiercely nationalistic, culturally closed nation.

From very humble beginnings, starting with second and third generation Japanese in Hawaii, and with LDS members of the American occupation armed forces, the Church grew slowly, but consistently. Around 1960, Church membership growth became significant. By the latter 1970s, Church growth in Japan was among the ten most rapid in the world, there were nine missions, and a temple was constructed in Tokyo.

Degree

MA

College and Department

David M. Kennedy Center

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1986

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm523

Keywords

Mormon Church, Japan, History, Missions, Japanese

Share

COinS