Abstract

This thesis analyzes additions to the gospels in the Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible. To assess the appropriateness of the JST additions, the thesis examines Joseph Smith's additions to verify whether they parallel the approaches of the original gospel writers to their audiences. There is strong indication that material added to the King James Version by the Joseph Smith Translation is consistent with the approaches of the original gospels to their audiences. Chapter one shows that the JST Matthew, like the KJV Matthew, is concerned with showing that Jesus fulfills Old Testament prophecy. Chapter two finds that JST Mark is as generic in its approach and even more fast-paced than the KJV Mark. In chapter three, Joseph Smith's translation of Luke extends Luke's stress on parables and women's issues. Chapter four demonstrates that JST John emphasizes John's central concern, the primacy of Jesus, even more emphatically than the KJV John.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; English

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1991

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm488

Keywords

Bible, English, Versions, Authorized, Joseph Smith, 1805-1844, Translations, History, criticism, N.T., New Testament, Gospels, interpretation

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