Abstract

The Genealogical Society of Utah initiated a worldwide microfilming program at the advent of modern microfilm technology. It succeeded in negotiating for and filming records because of the religious commitment of its leaders and workers, the financial assistance of the LDS Church, the increased concern for records loss as demonstrated by World War II, the maturation of microfilm technology after the war, and the concentration of many religious records in civil archives. Religious commitment enthused the Society's leaders to persist in their efforts in spite of seemingly insurmountable obstacles. The resources of the Church permitted the filming to continue without regard to profit. The destruction of World War II made archival leaders more amenable to the Society's program as a means to preserve the information in their records from catastrophic loss. The development of microfilm technology made the production of a good image possible and affordable. With religious records in civil archives, the efforts of religious leaders to restrict access were more easily overcome than might have been the case.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; History

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1985

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm483

Keywords

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Genealogical Society, History

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